News Articles

Dirco urges journalists to carry correct travel documents

Source: mail & Guardian, 14/11/2018

Quintal and Mumo were involved with meeting several local journalists and asking about their views before they were detained in the capital of Tanzania, Dar es Salaam, for five hours. According to Sisulu, Tanzanian authorities told her the journalists were detained because they had entered the country on visitors permits and not a working visa. After their detention, Quintal and Mumo were released and later received their passports from Tanzanian authorities.They subsequently left Tanzania. Tanzanian authorities have insisted the reason for their detention was the result of their contravention of visa regulations by working on visitors permits. There has been no mention of the work the authorities believe the pair undertook while in the country. In a statement following Quintal and Mumo’s release last week, CPJ confirmed Quintal and Mumo had been meeting with journalist in Tanzania to understand the challenges journalists there face. “Angela Quintal and Muthoki Mumo travelled to Tanzania to understand the challenges facing the Tanzanian press and to inform the global public,” CPJ Executive Director Joel Simon wrote. “It is deeply ironic that through their unjustified and abusive detention of our colleagues, Tanzanian authorities have made their work that much easier. It is now abundantly clear to anyone who followed the latest developments that Tanzanian journalists work in a climate of fear and intimidation. We call on the government of Tanzania to allow journalists to work freely and to allow those who defend their rights to access the country without interference.” Days before the journalist’s detention, Quintal had shared a story pertaining to the disappearance of Tanzanian journalist, Azory Gwanda on Twitter. In the same article shared by Quintal, it was reported that 27 journalists had been mistreated by Tanzanian police since the start of the year. “We will always be there for you when you are in trouble, but we would like it if you stuck to the rules and regulations of any country that you visit,” Sisulu explained. The department of international relations and cooperation (Dirco) stipulates that if South Africans travelling abroad do not comply with visa or permit requirements, they can be subjected to criminal prosecution, imprisonment, deportation, or be blacklisted. Sisulu told journalists that Dirco is available to help stranded journalists and travellers at anytime. If South Africans find themselves in distress while travelling abroad, they can call a 24-hour call centre on 012 351 1000 as part of Dirco’s new initiative, the Travel Smart Campaign. South African citizens are also invited to register for Rosa (Registration of South Africans Abroad) where travellers list their personal information, allowing Dirco to assist citizens who experience an emergency while abroad. Registration is voluntary and free of charge.


Search

  •    SA`S NEW travel rules prevented our minor children from attending a family funeral. My wife and children were on holiday in Florence, Italy, and I had returned early to our home in Singapore when we received the tragic news that our three-year-old niece had passed away. We wanted to return to SA immediately, in time for the funeral last Friday.... Read more...
  •    The refugee reception office in Port Elizabeth will have to be reopened, following a court judgment this week.... Read more...
  •    A man whose father fled Burundi during political turmoil and genocide there in 1994, has been given a fresh start at applying for asylum in South Africa after he was embroiled in a dispute with authorities for about a decade over a missed appointment.... Read more...
  •    THE media and the public will now be allowed to attend asylum seekers` appeals when conducted following the adoption of the Refugee Amendment Bill.... Read more...
  •    We live in exponential times. So says Justin Doo, territory manager, Middle East, Turkey & Africa at Okta, who presented on `Delivering truly digital experiences`, at the ITWeb Cloud Summit, held yesterday at The Forum in Bryanston.... Read more...
  •    Immigration law expert Stefanie de Saude Darbandi, representing a family from the Democratic Republic of the Congo (DRC), has helped bring about a change in immigration law by taking the case to the high court and Constitutional Court. This welcome development secures a change in the regulations relating to citizenship by naturalisation, allowing foreigners to apply for citizenship after five years’ permanent residence.... Read more...
  •    The technical specifications of the system `would not allow it`, the department has claimed. The Department of Home Affairs has told a Parliamentary Joint Committee on Intelligence and Security that the government`s identity-matching capability could not be used for mass surveillance, as its technical specs simply would not allow for it.... Read more...
  •    THE media and the public will now be allowed to attend asylum seekers` appeals when conducted following the adoption of the Refugee Amendment Bill.... Read more...
  •    THE media and the public will now be allowed to attend asylum seekers` appeals when conducted following the adoption of the Refugee Amendment Bill.... Read more...
  •    THE media and the public will now be allowed to attend asylum seekers` appeals when conducted following the adoption of the Refugee Amendment Bill.... Read more...

Get the latest Immigration News